Reflections on the Experiences of Turbaned Sikh Men in the Aftermath of 9/11

  • Kiran S.K. Arora University of Massachusetts Boston
Keywords: Sikhs, Psychotheraphy, Turban, 9/11, Counseling

Abstract

The murder of Trayvon Martin is a painful reminder of the violence perpetuated towards subjugated groups who are often deemed suspicious because of the color of their skin and/or clothing. The association of the hoodie and Black skin with being a member of a violent group is an association that is familiar for Sikh men. Many today are unaware of how Sikh men have been vilified because of their skin color and turbans. The terrorist attacks, which occurred on September 11, 2001, had a significant impact on turbaned Sikh men living in North America. These men have been targeted since then because of their shared visual image with the perpetrators of 9/11. This brief reflection discusses the experiences of discrimination these men have experienced, gives examples of psychological and relational injuries related to 9/11, and offers personal and professional lessons learned through conversations with turbaned Sikh men on their experiences.
Published
2013-04-01
How to Cite
Arora, K. (2013). Reflections on the Experiences of Turbaned Sikh Men in the Aftermath of 9/11. Journal for Social Action in Counseling & Psychology, 5(1), 116-121. Retrieved from https://openjournals.bsu.edu/jsacp/article/view/159